Panama Cruise. Aruba

If there is one island in all of the Caribbean, Aruba epitomizes what an island in the azure blue should be. Pixy dust, sandy beaches, as fine and soft as baby powder with warm bathwater lapping at the shore.

In the 15th century, Spanish explorers arrived to colonize Aruba. However, the Dutch defeated the Spaniards in 1636 and the island has remained in Dutch hands ever since then.

Sylvia spent the first morning snorkelling with an authentic Caribbean fish fry at lunch. Many snorkellers saw the red lion fish with its spiked dorsal fin. I went on a Land Rover tour into the outback on the second morning. The roads were rough much of the way, not fit even for walking.

Aruba is only about 30km off the coast of Venezuela and is called one of the ABC Islands . . . Aruba, Bonair and Curacao . . . these islands form part of the Dutch Antilles. In our opinion, the cleanest of all the Caribbean cities, Oranjestad, has a lot of influence from the Dutch, Spanish, French and Afrikaan. Soon, this island will be part of the EU, connected with the Netherlands, political only, not currency.

It was a scorching 34C and our seawater pool onboard was a welcome respite from cloudless skies and endless sun.

Stay tuned for our next port-of-call . . . Cartagena, Columbia.